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General Category => FPV Legalities => Topic started by: ched on June 14, 2020, 07:35:24 PM

Title: EASA - What's the latest?
Post by: ched on June 14, 2020, 07:35:24 PM
I'm trying to settle on my birthday present  :D
I have narrowed it down to 2 options 1 is sub 250gms the other above. I only currently fly sub250 so I'm not registered.
From what I have read the EU regs have been delayed till Nov 2020?
Any ideas if the exemptions are getting extended past 30th June 2020?

Am I correct in assuming that when the EU rules come in to operate any 'drone' with a camera (sub 250gms or over) we will be required to take an online test, register, and put appropriate stickers on 'drones'?

I don't want this to start any arguments as I think we all see this as a stupid system that wont help the main issues.

Any ideas?
Thanks
Title: Re: EASA - What's the latest?
Post by: ORCA on June 15, 2020, 01:32:30 PM
All delayed now until 31st December 2020. As things stand at the moment in the UK fitting of a camera no matter the weight requires test, registration and payment of the 'toy tax'. I gather talks are due between the BMFA and DfT/CAA this month. Its any ones guess if a concession is eventually agreed. The main worry is remote ID which I gather they want to bring in on 1/1/2021 and it seems they are not in favour of a site registration option(like an airfield) with them on the air nav charts.
https://bmfa.org/News/News-Page/ArticleID/2666/CAA-Updates-CAP1789-New-European-UAS-Regulations-General-Outline
Title: Re: EASA - What's the latest?
Post by: ched on June 15, 2020, 03:16:29 PM
All delayed now until 31st December 2020. As things stand at the moment in the UK fitting of a camera no matter the weight requires test, registration and payment of the 'toy tax'. I gather talks are due between the BMFA and DfT/CAA this month. Its any ones guess if a concession is eventually agreed. The main worry is remote ID which I gather they want to bring in on 1/1/2021 and it seems they are not in favour of a site registration option(like an airfield) with them on the air nav charts.
https://bmfa.org/News/News-Page/ArticleID/2666/CAA-Updates-CAP1789-New-European-UAS-Regulations-General-Outline
Cheers that's sort of what I thought. I did find the 31st Dec date after I posted.
I can't believe they think remote ID is workable with available technology. More madness.....

Thanks for your reply.
Title: Re: EASA - What's the latest?
Post by: ORCA on June 15, 2020, 06:25:17 PM
I read somewhere that there had been a contract(s) put out to develop a unit. My understanding(guess) of a system, similar to that proposed for the USA: on board system will consist of a very slimed down mobile phone Tx unit that will connect to a network provider(you'll pay all network connection/data fees etc). Onboard GPS for location, track and rough height(barometric altimeter for more accurate height); magnetic compass for heading; secure data module containing operator details etc. All the data from these units will be conveyed via the mobile network provider to the CAA's central hub and be plotted and recorded. Anyone checking on a drone will just use their smart phone, ring the CAA centre and get a display of the airspace as the phones GPS will know the location. Just my guess because there is no way any form of radar will work. This system provides all the incriminating evidence if you break the rules. In the states I believe they also want a system on the controlling Tx as well so that the location of the flyer can be linked to the drone being checked. Hope this makes sense, it's a real time reporting system using the mobile phone network to provide all info about the drone in question and possibly the flyer if they want to go that far.
Title: Re: EASA - What's the latest?
Post by: ched on June 15, 2020, 06:56:50 PM
I read somewhere that there had been a contract(s) put out to develop a unit. My understanding(guess) of a system, similar to that proposed for the USA: on board system will consist of a very slimed down mobile phone Tx unit that will connect to a network provider(you'll pay all network connection/data fees etc). Onboard GPS for location, track and rough height(barometric altimeter for more accurate height); magnetic compass for heading; secure data module containing operator details etc. All the data from these units will be conveyed via the mobile network provider to the CAA's central hub and be plotted and recorded. Anyone checking on a drone will just use their smart phone, ring the CAA centre and get a display of the airspace as the phones GPS will know the location. Just my guess because there is no way any form of radar will work. This system provides all the incriminating evidence if you break the rules. In the states I believe they also want a system on the controlling Tx as well so that the location of the flyer can be linked to the drone being checked. Hope this makes sense, it's a real time reporting system using the mobile phone network to provide all info about the drone in question and possibly the flyer if they want to go that far.
All sounds good to a politician but in the real world not everywhere has mobile coverage!! Especially remote places where the RAF practice low level flying!!
This whole rules mess is completely over the top for the actual risk, not the perceived risk. I have no problem with say gps limited height of 400ft as that creates a proper barrier between models and real aircraft. Actually maybe that's my misunderstanding. i.e. I guess Amazon delivery 'drones' come under same rules they are trying to create or would they be over 25kg. I'm not by any means saying rules are not needed to keep everyone as safe as possible but I don't believe there is currently a system to monitor all aircrafts that are capable of carrying pilots. Do hang gliders, paragliders, gliders, small planes etc have to have a real time tracking system that reports their position back to CAA???? So why do it with things that weight so little?
Cheers for posting, all useful info.
Not having a go just venting sorry.
Title: Re: EASA - What's the latest?
Post by: ORCA on June 15, 2020, 08:34:49 PM
Sub 70kg powered para motors and hang gliders are not regulated in any way(used to be just foot launched but now you can have wheels). For the pilot, no licence , no test, no medical, nada. For the aircraft, no certification, no registration, no radio, no remote ID, nada. In fact it's just 'buy and fly'. But, I think a training course would save you killing yourself!
Title: Re: EASA - What's the latest?
Post by: ched on October 22, 2020, 10:12:42 PM
OK so as we are nearing the 1st Jan 2021 is there any readable info on what is actually happening?
I have been flying sub250 but looking at regs it appears that anything with a camera will require pilot/user to be registered.
Any thoughts other than it's a stupid system?
Cheers.